Monthly Archives: October 2015

YES: SPEEDING UP THE PACE OF LIFE BRINGS MANY DISADVANTAGES AND PROBLEMS FOR MODERN SOCIETY, MAKING THE ADVANTAGES OF SLOWING DOWN A COMPARATIVELY ATTRACTIVE ONE.

1. In many of our economic activities and work-lives, excessively speeding up the pace of life has resulted in disastrous financial and health consequences, making the act of slowing down practical for individuals, institutions and entire societies.

2. In many intellectual and educational endeavors, slowing down helps engage the deep learning centres and processes of the human brain, facilitating the acquisition of complex knowledge which is increasingly vital to modern life.

3. From a moral and ethical standpoint, slowing down provides opportunities for many to reflect on our personal choices, relationships and decisions in life, which is invaluable in a modern world that compels us to make many decisions hastily and move on to the next stage without due consideration or insight.

4. As a modern consumer driven society, slowing down the pace of our material acquisitions may yield important and practical benefits, as we collectively engage in the act of reducing, reusing and recycling, thereby investing in our collective environmental well-being.

NO: MODERNITY THRIVES ON SPEED AND SLOWING DOWN THE PACE OF LIFE IS A REGRESSIVE RATHER THAN PROGRESSIVE ACT, AND WOULD BE A DISADVANTAGE IN MANY ASPECTS OF OUR LIVES.

1. The dangers of speeding up excessively are undeniable but the economic benefits of speeding up moderately are more than comparable and should be encouraged, as they increase the many factors – pace of production, transaction volumes and acceleration of learning cycles – that are integral to economic growth and prosperity.

2. We live in a modern age saturated with data and information, making the act of slowing down and processing information a less viable one compared to developing skills that speed up our capabilities to process complex knowledge.

3. Despite our romantic notions concerning the purported benefits of slowing down, the pace of scientific research, technological development and its integration into our lives should be speeded up, as doing so provides us with more avenues and innovations to solve the major societal challenges of our time.

YES: STUDYING MATHEMATICS PROVIDES IN-DEPTH VIEWS INTO THE COMPLEXITIES OF THE DISCIPLINE AND IS INTELLECTUALLY SATISFYING BUT ULTIMATELY LESS USEFUL TO MOST INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETAL WELL-BEING.

1. In many acclaimed educational systems worldwide, the foundational levels of mathematics contain many topics that may engage youths’ intellectual curiosity but prove less useful if they specialize in other fields upon graduation from high school.

2. Studied on its own at the undergraduate level, mathematics may appear to be a highly abstract and specialized discipline for enthusiasts but appears less relevant to the concerns of acquiring a professional qualification.

3. At its more advanced levels of study,  mathematics become extremely complex and specialists may devote a major portion of post-graduate work or experience on the identification and solution of highly abstract mathematical problems that are totally removed from everyday life.

NO: STUDYING MATHEMATICS IS BOTH INTELLECTUALLY SATISFYING AND PROVIDE PRACTICAL MEANS FOR BOTH INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETY TO ENRICH OUR LIVES AND OVERALL WELL-BEING.

1. It is the process rather than mere data one acquires that is useful in the study of complex mathematical topics at the high school level, as these topics help develop the critical thinking and visualizing skills in students that are so vital to holistic development.

2. At the undergraduate level, mathematics is integrated as a component both vital and applicable to a wide variety of seemingly unrelated disciplines, including economics, psychology and social work.

3. The more advanced levels of mathematical study aim to identify and contribute practical solutions to major challenges faced by humanity, such as complex formulations to calculate the rate of melting polar ice-caps, which may be vital to international deliberations on climate change.